Track your pregnancy

The First Trimester

Start following you and your baby’s week by week journey.

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Wk3

If your egg is fertilised by one of the millions of sperm released when you last had sex, congratulations - you’ve just conceived!

The rapidly dividing egg will make its way along your fallopian tube towards your uterus, where it will take up residence for the rest of your pregnancy. The journey takes around seven days from the time the egg was released from the ovary.

Although you’ll probably be unaware of the amazing transformation happening inside you, your body has been busy getting ready for the arrival of the fertilised egg.

The lining of your uterus has thickened and is supplied with blood, ready to support a developing baby.

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What you can do:

    • As soon as you suspect you are pregnant, you can use the date you started your last period to calculate your due date. Your doctors will use this date until they can accurately measure the size of your foetus to get a better estimate of your due date.
    • If you haven’t started to read up about pregnancy and raising a child, now’s a good time. Click here to view our pregnancy checklist to make sure you are prepared.
    • Pregnancy increases your need for vitamins, minerals and nutrients like folic acid, iodine and iron. Start taking a pregnancy multivitamin and mineral supplement such as Elevit if you haven’t already. No other pregnancy multivitamin contains more folic acid and iron than Elevit*.

*Compared to leading pregnancy multivitamins as at May 2021.

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Once the egg has been fertilised by a sperm, it forms a single cell containing all genetic material needed to make a baby.

This cell contains 46 chromosomes (23 from you and 23 from the father). These genetic 'building blocks' will determine the characteristics of your baby, such as their sex, and eye and hair colour. As you and your partner are responsible for half of the chromosomes each, your baby may look like you in some ways, and have other traits from the father.

Between 12 and 20 hours after fertilisation, the single cell splits. These cells continue dividing to produce a ball of cells. This is the beginning of new life.

What you can do:

    • As soon as you suspect you are pregnant, you can use the date you started your last period to calculate your due date. Your doctors will use this date until they can accurately measure the size of your foetus to get a better estimate of your due date.
    • If you haven't started to read up about pregnancy and raising a child, now's a good time. Click here to view our pregnancy checklist to make sure you are prepared.
    • Pregnancy increases your need for vitamins, minerals and nutrients like folic acid, iodine and iron. Start taking a pregnancy multivitamin and mineral supplement such as Elevit if you haven't already. Elevit contains the highest level of folic acid and iron of any pregnancy multivitamin in Australia*.

*Compared to leading pregnancy multivitamins as at August 2020.

Personalise your Journey

Wk4

Some early pregnancy symptoms can feel a bit like pre-menstrual symptoms, which can be confusing. You may feel moody and bloated and have sore, swollen breasts.

When the blastocyst, which eventually becomes the embryo, burrows into the wall of your uterus, it may cause some light bleeding called 'spotting'. It's not a period, but some women do mistake it for one and think they're not pregnant, especially as it usually happens 10-14 days after conception, around the time of your usual period.

Inside your belly, your uterus is starting to expand to make way for the growing baby.

What you can do:

  • Book an appointment with your doctor. As well as making sure you’re in good health, your GP will discuss the different options available to you for your pregnancy and the birth – midwife or obstetrician for example?
  • Eat right to make sure you’re getting the recommended daily intake of important vitamins and minerals, such as folic acid and iron. Visit Elevit.com.au for a full guide to diet and nutrition during pregnancy, including what you should be avoiding.
  • Stop smoking – that goes for your partner too.

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By the time the tiny bundle of cells gets to your uterus, it's called a blastocyst, which means a fluid filled ball. It will float there for a little while and continue to grow before attaching to the wall of your uterus around 10 to 14 days after fertilisation.

Once implanted into the thick uterine lining, the blastocyst forms into two sections. The inner group of cells will go on to become your baby, and the outer group that's attached to the uterus wall will become the placenta.

The inner group of cells will divide into three layers, each one responsible for different parts and systems of your developing baby.

What you can do:

  • Book an appointment with your doctor. As well as making sure you’re in good health, your GP will discuss the different options available to you for your pregnancy and the birth – midwife or obstetrician for example?
  • Eat right to make sure you’re getting the recommended daily intake of important vitamins and minerals, such as folic acid and iron. Visit Elevit.com.au for a full guide to diet and nutrition during pregnancy, including what you should be avoiding.
  • Stop smoking – that goes for your partner too.

Personalise your Journey

Wk5

If you’re still in the dark about being pregnant, your body might start giving you some not-so-subtle hints.

You may be sleeping more than usual and feeling tired or sluggish during the day. Feelings of nausea or even some vomiting could signal that you’re experiencing morning sickness. Use the article links below to read up on tips on how to control symptoms, and consider taking a supplement, such as Elevit Morning Sickness Relief.

What you can do:

  • Confirm your pregnancy with a home pregnancy testing kit or visit your GP.
  • Stop drinking alcohol and reduce your caffeine intake. Avoid energy drinks and consider switching to decaf or water.
  • Try to stay active by walking and exercising daily.

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Your baby is growing every day and at this stage will measure around 1.25mm from top to bottom. That’s about the size of a poppy seed.

Developmentally, there's a lot going on. A number of your baby's vital organs are already beginning to form, including the heart and the neural tube that forms the brain, spinal cord and central nervous system.

The placenta is still not fully operational, so your baby will get most of the nutrition needed from the yolk sac that formed after implantation. The placenta will start working in the coming weeks.

What you can do:

  • Confirm your pregnancy with a home pregnancy testing kit or visit your GP.
  • Stop drinking alcohol and reduce your caffeine intake. Avoid energy drinks and consider switching to decaf or water.
  • Try to stay active by walking and exercising daily.

Personalise your Journey

Wk6

Signs that you are pregnant are starting to increase. Physically your breasts may still be quite tender and feel fuller and heavier than usual, and you might be experiencing dizziness, especially after prolonged periods of sitting down.

Other things you may notice are new sensitivities to smell, especially around food. Some foods or scents you used to like may now turn your stomach, and you may find yourself craving a food you used to hate.

Pregnancy hormones can cause mood swings and it may seem like you're riding a rollercoaster of emotions from one day to another. You may be feeling teary and vulnerable one minute and happy and excited the next. Talk to friends who have had kids and know what you’re going through, and reassure your partner that it’s not him – it’s you!

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This week your baby is around 2-4 mm long and as big as a pea.

It's a very important week in your baby's development as the neural tube that connects the brain and spinal cord closes over. The digestive and blood circulatory systems are starting to develop too, and the heart is the first organ to start to work as it begins beating.

Your baby's head is also beginning to take shape and internal organs like the kidneys and liver continue to grow. The beginnings of your baby's arms and legs are appearing as little buds on their body, and the embryo has gone from ball shaped, to more like a c-shaped tadpole.

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Wk7

As your pregnancy progresses, so will the changes in your body. You may notice your nipples starting to go brown and bumpy and the veins on your breasts becoming more noticeable as the blood supply increases.

Thanks to those pregnancy hormones, your digestive system can become sluggish and your food will take longer to pass through your system. This can lead to constipation, which can persist throughout pregnancy.

Ease the symptoms by eating high-fibre food, drinking lots of water and exercising regularly.

You may find your skin is being affected by pregnancy too. Some women have a 'glow' and look fantastic, while others break out in spots like a teenager. Diet can help manage this, so eat a healthy diet, full of fresh fruit and vegetables.

What you can do:

  • Remember to involve your partner and letting him be involved in these early stages by telling him about the changes you’re feeling. Involve him in your antenatal checks and ultrasound scans so he can stay connected to you and the baby.
  • Gentle exercise for about 30 minutes a day will keep you fit and healthy and help reduce stress and anxiety. If you’re unsure, check with your doctor about what exercises are most appropriate as your pregnancy progresses.
  • If morning sickness is bothering you, consider taking a supplement made specifically for the condition, like Elevit Morning Sickness Relief. It can help provide relief of symptoms such as nausea and vomiting.

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About the size of a blueberry your baby’s body length is around 4-5mm this week and they are starting to look more human.

A little face is forming on your baby's large human-like head, with tiny nostrils, lips and a tongue becoming visible. The eyes are appearing as dark spots under thin, transparent skin. The arms and legs are continuing to grow and you can even make out the beginnings of hands and feet.

Your baby's heart is continuing to grow and is beating at about 150 beats per minute, which is twice as fast as yours. The digestive system, liver, kidneys, internal sex organs and lungs are developing and will soon be complete.

What you can do:

  • Remember to involve your partner and letting him be involved in these early stages by telling him about the changes you’re feeling. Involve him in your antenatal checks and ultrasound scans so he can stay connected to you and the baby.
  • Gentle exercise for about 30 minutes a day will keep you fit and healthy and help reduce stress and anxiety. If you’re unsure, check with your doctor about what exercises are most appropriate as your pregnancy progresses.
  • If morning sickness is bothering you, consider taking a supplement made specifically for the condition, like Elevit Morning Sickness Relief. It can help provide relief of symptoms such as nausea and vomiting.

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Wk8

Although your tummy will still be quite flat, your uterus has grown considerably and could be pressing nicely on your bladder by now. This will make you want to go to the toilet more often.

If you're having to get up at night to go and it's interrupting your sleep, you could try drinking less fluid in the evening. Alternatively, embrace the nightly wake-ups and consider yourself in training for when baby arrives.

What you can do:

  • If your bras are feeling tight, consider buying a few larger ones. Just don’t invest too much cash yet – your breasts are going to get bigger.
  • Your first ultrasound to check on your baby's development is normally taken between 8-12 weeks. If you haven't had your first antenatal appointment with your doctor yet, you should arrange this.
  • If you are working, it may be a good idea to check on your maternity leave entitlements and conditions. They can differ from company to company. Your partner can also check on his paternity entitlements.

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From top to bottom your baby is measuring around 14-20mm and is around the size of a kidney bean.

Your baby's gorgeous face is continuing to take shape, with the jaw and nose developing, along with the teeth. It's also an important time for the formation of the eyes and inner ears.

Bone cells are beginning to replace the original cartilage that was laid down, as the arms and legs lengthen. Little webbed fingers and toes have started to grow, and intestines are developing inside the umbilical cord. It seems a strange place for them to be, but they will move into the body a little later.

Your baby's circulatory system is also growing and you can now see a network of blood vessels under a layer of thin, transparent skin.

What you can do:

  • If your bras are feeling tight, consider buying a few larger ones. Just don’t invest too much cash yet – your breasts are going to get bigger.
  • Your first ultrasound to check on your baby's development is normally taken between 8-12 weeks. If you haven't had your first antenatal appointment with your doctor yet, you should arrange this.
  • If you are working, it may be a good idea to check on your maternity leave entitlements and conditions. They can differ from company to company. Your partner can also check on his paternity entitlements.

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Wk9

Well into your first trimester now and you might be managing a number of pregnancy symptoms such as morning sickness, tender breasts, food cravings and mood swings.

It’s important to look after yourself and get plenty of rest when you can. Keep late nights to a minimum and go to bed early if you need to.

Although you won't 'look' pregnant yet, your jeans might be starting to feel a bit snug. If you’re not ready to shop for maternity wear just yet, choose looser clothes where you can, or invest in a waistband extender, or belly belt.

What you can do:

  • Your pelvic floor muscles will begin to take the strain of pregnancy. Start pelvic floor exercises and try to do them a few times a day.
  • Do some exercise with your partner, even if it’s just a walk. It’s important that you’re both fit and healthy for when baby arrives, and it's a good opportunity to spend time together and talk about what lies ahead.
  • Talk with your doctor or midwife if anything about your pregnancy is bothering you or if you're concerned about birth and motherhood.

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Your baby is becoming more recognisable as a little human being and this week measures around 22-30mm – that’s the size of a large olive.

The head is still very big compared to the body, but the face is coming along nicely. There's a nose forming around those tiny nostrils, and the eyelids have grown to almost cover the round dots that are the eyes.

Your baby's major internal organs are continuing to develop and the intestines are starting to move from the umbilical cord into the belly. Joints are now forming in the arms and legs so they'll be able to bend, and the fingers and toes are almost developed.

Cartilage continues to turn into bone, making the beginnings of your baby's skeleton.

What you can do:

  • Your pelvic floor muscles will begin to take the strain of pregnancy. Start pelvic floor exercises and try to do them a few times a day.
  • Do some exercise with your partner, even if it’s just a walk. It’s important that you’re both fit and healthy for when baby arrives, and it's a good opportunity to spend time together and talk about what lies ahead.
  • Talk with your doctor or midwife if anything about your pregnancy is bothering you or if you're concerned about birth and motherhood.

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Wk10

Your uterus is making room for your growing baby and is now about the size of a prune. A combination of hormones and nutritional needs from the baby may be making you feel warmer, hungrier, thirstier, and more emotional than usual.

Drink plenty of water and try to avoid reaching for sugary or snacks high in saturated fat when you're hungry. Choose healthy options, such as carrot sticks, a handful of nuts or a piece of fruit.

Another change might be in your interest – or lack of – in sex. Some women find they are completely disinterested in sex, especially if they are coping with multiple pregnancy symptoms like morning sickness and tiredness. Others find that pregnancy increases their sex drive and they're keen to be intimate more often. Try not to worry about your attitude towards sex too much at this time, but do talk to your partner so he knows how you feel.

What you can do:

  • You will be due for an antenatal check-up with your doctor between 10 and 16 weeks. Your doctor will advise you how often you need these checks. It's usually about every 4-6 weeks to begin with, getting more frequent as your due date approaches.
  • Oral hygiene is particularly important during pregnancy. Keep up your regular dental visits, and remember to tell your dentist that you're pregnant as it may affect some treatments.

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A big milestone this week as your baby graduates from embryo to foetus. Weighing around 5g, baby is measuring around 31-42mm and is about the same size as a prune.

The face and head are still developing and tiny tooth buds that will go on to form teeth have started forming in the gums.

The arms and legs are now complete, with wrists and ankles and most of the joints having formed. Along with that beating heart, more of the internal organs will begin to work although the lungs, stomach and intestines are still developing.

What you can do:

  • You will be due for an antenatal check-up with your doctor between 10 and 16 weeks. Your doctor will advise you how often you need these checks. It's usually about every 4-6 weeks to begin with, getting more frequent as your due date approaches.
  • Oral hygiene is particularly important during pregnancy. Keep up your regular dental visits, and remember to tell your dentist that you're pregnant as it may affect some treatments.

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Wk11

You may have put on about 1kg in weight by this time, unless you've been unfortunate enough to have bad morning sickness. Your baby is still very small so he or she isn’t to blame. Supporting systems, fluids and a higher volume of blood usually accounts for any weight you have gained.

If you’re getting leg or foot cramps, it’s common in pregnancy, although the cause is unclear. Cramps can become more frequent and severe as pregnancy progresses, and can be eased by gently stretching your feet and legs. Walking in bare feet may help, or you could try asking your partner for a leg massage. Magnesium deficiency is a possible cause of leg cramps, so the magnesium in your Elevit daily multivitamin may help so ensure you’re taking them regularly.

What you can do:

  • As your body continues to change, your usual exercise might not feel as comfortable as it used to. Many pregnant women choose swimming as their exercise of choice as they grow. As well as a great, all-over body workout, you might enjoy the weightless feeling of being in the water, and it won’t make you overheat.
  • Prenatal screening tests to check the health and development of your baby are carried out from 11 weeks. Talk to your doctor to make an appointment.
  • Keep drinking lots of water. Pregnancy will increase your need for fluids and you should avoid getting dehydrated. Water is better for you than soft drinks.

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Weighing around 8g and measuring 44 - 60mm, your little one is now the size of a lime, pretty big when you think about how it started out not too long ago.

The most critical stage of your baby's development is complete. The vital organs have formed and are now starting to work.

The head is still quite big, but over the next week, the body will start to catch up. Eyelids have grown over the eyes and fused together. They will separate later on. Irises are developing in the eyes and these will soon start to get some colour. The ears are growing, fingers and toes have separated into single digits and tiny fingernails are starting to appear.

What you can do:

  • As your body continues to change, your usual exercise might not feel as comfortable as it used to. Many pregnant women choose swimming as their exercise of choice as they grow. As well as a great, all-over body workout, you might enjoy the weightless feeling of being in the water, and it won’t make you overheat.
  • Prenatal screening tests to check the health and development of your baby are carried out from 11 weeks. Talk to your doctor to make an appointment.
  • Keep drinking lots of water. Pregnancy will increase your need for fluids and you should avoid getting dehydrated. Water is better for you than soft drinks.

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Wk12

Congratulations! You have reached the end of the 1st trimester.

Some of those challenging pregnancy symptoms that may have affected you could start to subside over the next few days and weeks. Your energy levels may also start improving.

Your uterus will now start to move up and outward, easing the pressure on your bladder that made you need the toilet more often. It's a brief respite though. Frequent urination will return as your baby gets bigger.

You may notice changes to your skin, such as dark spots on your face or neck. Sun exposure can affect these skin discolorations, so wear sunscreen and cover up when you go outside. If it's bothering you, talk to your healthcare professional.

What you can do:

  • It's time for your 12-week ultrasound to check on baby's development. It can be an emotional, exciting moment when you see your baby for the first time. It's a bit too early to tell the sex on an ultrasound, but if you’re curious ask your doctor about the Harmony test, which can reveal gender as early as 10 weeks.
  • Some couples wait until baby has passed the 12-week ultrasound with flying colours before telling their friends and relatives they're going to become parents. It can be a very special time - not to mention a relief - so enjoy the pleasure it brings your loved ones.
  • Antenatal classes help you prepare for labour, birth and parenthood. Ask your midwife or GP what's available in your local area.

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Measuring about 61mm and weighing in at an impressive 8-14g, your baby is approximately the size of a plum this week.

Organs, muscles, limbs and bones are all in place, and will continue to develop as they mature.

With a more human-looking face, your baby can now smile and frown. The vocal cords are forming, and baby can even suck her thumb.

The placenta is now also formed, although it will continue to grow as your baby grows. It's working hard to supply your baby's nutritional needs and carry away waste products via the umbilical cord.

What you can do:

  • It's time for your 12-week ultrasound to check on baby's development. It can be an emotional, exciting moment when you see your baby for the first time. It's a bit too early to tell the sex on an ultrasound, but if you’re curious ask your doctor about the Harmony test, which can reveal gender as early as 10 weeks.
  • Some couples wait until baby has passed the 12-week ultrasound with flying colours before telling their friends and relatives they're going to become parents. It can be a very special time - not to mention a relief - so enjoy the pleasure it brings your loved ones.
  • Antenatal classes help you prepare for labour, birth and parenthood. Ask your midwife or GP what's available in your local area.

Personalise your Journey

Wk13

Pregnancy hormones can make gums more sensitive and easily irritated, so watch out for sore or even bleeding gums while brushing. If your gums are tender, be gentle when you brush and floss, and try using a softer toothbrush with a smaller head. Visit your dentist if gum problems persist.

With the ligaments around your uterus starting to stretch to accommodate your growing bump, you may start to feel a slight pulling in your belly. It’s not the only thing that’ll be stretching soon. The skin on your breasts and over your baby bump will need to expand over the coming months. Many women use body oil or moisturiser to help soothe skin.

What you can do:

  • Take advantage of higher energy levels and adopt some good exercise habits. It may have been hard to exercise if you’ve been feeling sick and tired, but now that you may be feeling better, 30 mins of light exercise daily will help keep you healthy and happy.
  • You may want to tell your employer you’re expecting a baby now. You’ll need to discuss when you plan to stop working before the baby’s born, and when you’d like to come back, if you intend to return.

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As round as a peach and as long as a green bean, this week your baby weighs about 23g and measures 65-78mm.

Your little one is floating around in a sac of amniotic fluid and looks just like a baby now. The internal organs are formed and maturing, but not all of them are functioning yet. The liver is starting to make bile and the pancreas is producing insulin, both of which are essential for digestion.

The eyes and ears are moving into the correct position on the head, although the ears are still forming and hearing is yet to develop. Your baby may be able to sense sound vibrations through its skin.

What you can do:

  • Take advantage of higher energy levels and adopt some good exercise habits. It may have been hard to exercise if you’ve been feeling sick and tired, but now that you may be feeling better, 30 mins of light exercise daily will help keep you healthy and happy.
  • You may want to tell your employer you’re expecting a baby now. You’ll need to discuss when you plan to stop working before the baby’s born, and when you’d like to come back, if you intend to return.

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Wk14

As your breasts continue to grow, the veins will appear more pronounced due to the increased blood supply. They may start to make a substance called colostrum. This is a thick, nutritious liquid that feeds your baby for the first day or so after birth, before your breast milk appears. It is unclear why some women start producing colostrum during pregnancy, and many women won’t produce any until after birth.

Some women experience constipation during pregnancy. As well as your digestive system moving slowly, your growing uterus will start to press on your bowel. To help reduce the symptoms, eat fresh high-fibre food, drink plenty of water and take regular exercise. Talk to your healthcare professional if symptoms continue to bother you.

A brown line called the ‘linea nigra’ may appear on your belly, running from your belly button downwards. If you can’t see it yet, it may appear later in your pregnancy. This is normal and fades after the birth.

What you can do:

  • Don’t forget to take some photos of your bump. While you might not feel very photogenic as you grow, it will be amazing to look back at the incredible job your body did once baby arrives.
  • Drink plenty of water and empty your bladder often to help reduce the chance of a urinary tract infection. Visit your doctor straight away if you have any pain, burning or stinging when you go to the toilet.
  • Keep taking Elevit throughout your pregnancy to support the needs of both you and your baby.

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Curl your hand into a fist. That’s about the size of your baby this week

Measuring 80-93 mm and weighing around 43 g your little one is growing quickly. The nervous system is starting to work, they can bend their arms and legs, and although baby's lungs aren’t mature yet, it's started to practice breathing movements.

There's activity on the head too, as the eyelids continue to develop, and there's even a little bit of hair starting to grow on the scalp.

What you can do:

  • Don’t forget to take some photos of your bump. While you might not feel very photogenic as you grow, it will be amazing to look back at the incredible job your body did once baby arrives.
  • Drink plenty of water and empty your bladder often to help reduce the chance of a urinary tract infection. Visit your doctor straight away if you have any pain, burning or stinging when you go to the toilet.
  • Keep taking Elevit throughout your pregnancy to support the needs of both you and your baby.

Personalise your Journey

Wk15

Your heart is working hard to pump approximately 20 per cent more blood around your body. The extra volume is necessary to cater for your growing baby and its support systems, such as the placenta, and it’ll increase as your pregnancy progresses. To help your blood circulation, try sleeping on your left side when you go to bed.

This increase in blood flow can also swell the lining of your nose, making you prone to nasal stuffiness and nosebleeds. When you blow your nose, do it gently so you don’t irritate the lining too much.

Another interesting ‘side effect’ of pregnancy is faster hair and nail growth. You may find your hair looks thicker as it’s growing faster than usual and not falling out as much. Your nails are likely to get stronger too.

What you can do:

  • Pregnancy is very demanding on your body, both physically and emotionally. Take some time to learn a few relaxation techniques that you can use when you’re feeling stressed. Controlled breathing exercises, mindfulness and mediation can be helpful.
  • If you’re having trouble getting comfortable at night, try using some extra pillows to help support your bump. Placing one between your legs can also take pressure off your lower back.
  • you may be entitled to when you become a new parent. There are a range available depending on your individual circumstances.

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The size of an apple this week baby is around 70g and measures 104-114mm long.

A layer of very fine hair called lanugo is starting to cover your baby's body. This hair will help to keep it at the right temperature throughout your pregnancy.

Beneath the thin, transparent skin, you can see the ribs and blood vessels.

Your baby is now busy growing little eyebrows above the eyes, and hair on the top of the head. Hearing mechanisms are forming inside the skull, but the brain isn’t completely finished so baby won't be able to make sense of the sound quite yet.

What you can do:

  • Pregnancy is very demanding on your body, both physically and emotionally. Take some time to learn a few relaxation techniques that you can use when you’re feeling stressed. Controlled breathing exercises, mindfulness and mediation can be helpful.
  • If you’re having trouble getting comfortable at night, try using some extra pillows to help support your bump. Placing one between your legs can also take pressure off your lower back.
  • you may be entitled to when you become a new parent. There are a range available depending on your individual circumstances.

Personalise your Journey

Wk16

If you’ve been pregnant before, you may start to feel a little flutter in your belly sometime soon. If it’s your first pregnancy, you may not notice it for a few more weeks.

This is known as the ‘quickening’ and it’s your baby moving about in the amniotic fluid as it becomes more active. Some women describe the feeling as a fluttering, or little bubbles, in their belly. It’ll come and go, and get more noticeable as your pregnancy progresses.

If your regular clothes have reached the end of their usefulness, it’s time to go shopping. As well as dedicated maternity wear stores, many of your usual high street stores will stock maternity ranges, both in store and online. Many women also opt for simply buying clothes in a larger size. Just remember to prioritise comfort, and if you are thinking of breastfeeding look for tops that allow access to your breasts.

What you can do:

  • You should have had your first antenatal check-up by now. It's an important appointment, so if you haven't been yet, make a time to go this week.
  • Find out about antenatal classes and make a booking. These useful education sessions will help you, and your partner, prepare for labour and look after a newborn. You'll also be able to ask questions and meet other expectant couples.

Personalise your Journey

Baby is getting taller and measuring 108-116mm this week. The size of an avocado and weighing about 110g, if you were to have an ultrasound this week, chances are you’d be able to find out the sex of your baby.

Your baby's bones are starting to get harder and the beginning of the skeleton is forming. Muscles are responding to signals from the brain now, which means it can co-ordinate movements and they won't be so jerky. Already moving about in the fluid in the amniotic sac, now that the joints are working, it can flex, bend and kick its arms and legs and even do somersaults! There's still plenty of room in there at the moment for little athletics so hopefully you’ll start to feel these movements very soon.

What you can do:

  • You should have had your first antenatal check-up by now. It's an important appointment, so if you haven't been yet, make a time to go this week.
  • Find out about antenatal classes and make a booking. These useful education sessions will help you, and your partner, prepare for labour and look after a newborn. You'll also be able to ask questions and meet other expectant couples.

Personalise your Journey

Wk17

Feeling hungry? Your appetite is probably increasing, especially with morning sickness easing off. Follow a well-balanced diet and keep a good supply of healthy foods and snacks around so you’re not tempted to nibble on sugary, fatty treats. Try eating small healthy snacks more frequently throughout the days, rather than just a few large meals.

You may also be craving certain foods and be turned off by others. This is a common pregnancy condition and can affect both foods you loved before and ones you didn’t like. However, if you’re craving odd things that are not normally foods, talk to your doctor.

It’s normal to have a thin, white discharge, called leucorrhea in pregnancy as you produce more mucus to keep your vagina healthy. If it’s irritating you, or if it’s coloured or smells bad, talk to your doctor.

What you can do:

  • As your bump becomes more obvious people may want to touch it. While they’re just being curious and most will usually ask first, it can feel uncomfortable or annoying. If you’re tired of the attention, just politely refuse. It’s your belly after all!
  • You may need to buy another maternity bra as your breasts keep on growing. If you've been lucky enough to manage until now with your regular bras, it could be time to go for a fitting.
  • Keep taking Elevit to help support your diet. There are benefits for both you and your growing baby all the way through your pregnancy.

Personalise your Journey

You could hold your baby in the palm of your hand this week – they are around 12cm long and weigh about 140g.

Your baby may have been quite skinny so far, but fat will now start to build up under the skin to help provide warmth and energy.

The head and body are more in proportion at last. Hair continues to grow on the top of the head and both the eyebrows and eyelashes are lengthening.

An exciting development is that baby may now hear sounds from outside your body, although they will be muted a bit by the watery layer around it. A loud noise like a shout or a door banging might be loud enough to make it flinch in surprise.

What you can do:

  • As your bump becomes more obvious people may want to touch it. While they’re just being curious and most will usually ask first, it can feel uncomfortable or annoying. If you’re tired of the attention, just politely refuse. It’s your belly after all!
  • You may need to buy another maternity bra as your breasts keep on growing. If you've been lucky enough to manage until now with your regular bras, it could be time to go for a fitting.
  • Keep taking Elevit to help support your diet. There are benefits for both you and your growing baby all the way through your pregnancy.

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Wk18

You may be able to feel the top of your uterus by now just below your navel. If your growing bump is starting to make you uncomfortable in bed and impacting on your sleep, you could try tucking a few pillows around yourself or invest in a body or pregnancy pillow.

If you’re feeling a pain or ache in the sides of your lower belly, near your groin, it could be round ligament pain. It can occur between about 18 and 24 weeks and is caused by your expanding uterus stretching the ligaments around it. Round ligament pain can be reduced by putting your feet up when you can and avoiding standing or walking for long periods. The discomfort usually reduces after 24 weeks.

You may find your sex drive is increased due to more blood flowing around your pelvic area. Sex isn’t considered harmful in a normal pregnancy, but you may need to find positions that are more comfortable for you.

What you can do:

  • It's time for your 18 to 20 week ultrasound scan to check on baby's size and development. It's exciting to see how much it has grown and you can find out the sex if you want and haven’t already.
  • Keep moving. While your belly is getting larger, your energy levels should still be pretty good so try to remain active.
  • Spend some quality time with your partner. Have a date night to the movies or have dinner out at a favourite restaurant. Once baby arrives it may be harder to find time for this, at least for a little while.
  • Remember to wear gloves if you're doing any gardening and wash your hands well afterwards as you could pick up potentially harmful bacteria from the ground.

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The next time you’re in the supermarket pick up a capsicum. Your baby is about this size now, weighing 200g and around 14cm long.

Now the finger pads have formed, your baby's getting its very own set of fingerprints. They'll be fully formed by the time it arrives.

The lungs are starting to develop little air sacs that will allow baby to breath air once it's born. They're not fully mature yet though and the placenta is supplying the oxygen.

The bowel is beginning to fill with a think, tar-like substance called meconium, which will be passed in the first days after birth. It's made up of the amniotic fluid being swallowed.

Your baby's very active now, trying out all its new limbs and joints. You may find the little one moves less during the day and gets active just as you want to get some sleep at night.

What you can do:

  • It's time for your 18 to 20 week ultrasound scan to check on baby's size and development. It's exciting to see how much it has grown and you can find out the sex if you want and haven’t already.
  • Keep moving. While your belly is getting larger, your energy levels should still be pretty good so try to remain active.
  • Spend some quality time with your partner. Have a date night to the movies or have dinner out at a favourite restaurant. Once baby arrives it may be harder to find time for this, at least for a little while.
  • Remember to wear gloves if you're doing any gardening and wash your hands well afterwards as you could pick up potentially harmful bacteria from the ground.

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Wk19

The extra weight and fluid you’re carrying around to support your growing baby may be causing your feet to swell. Stretching ligaments may also be contributing to the condition. Don’t suffer with tight shoes. Invest in some comfortable, supportive new shoes to accommodate your swelling feet. You’ll probably want to put the heels away for now.

You may notice a few little red marks appearing on your body. These are officially called ‘spider naevi’ - little blood vessels caused by pregnancy hormones. They can crop up anywhere, but they’re usually temporary.

What you can do:

  • Get a pregnancy massage. As well as helping you to relax and ease some of those pregnancy discomforts, massage can also have a beneficial effect on your circulation and digestive system. Check with your midwife before you have any kind of massage and make sure you tell your massage therapist you’re pregnant.
  • Try and get a good balance between staying active and getting some rest. Going to bed at the same time each night might help you stay in a good sleep routine. Easing off on high intensity exercise and opting for walking or swimming instead, might feel more comfortable as your bump continues to grow.

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As big as a mango, your baby now weighs 240g and is 15cm long.

A greasy, white coating called vernix is beginning to cover your baby from head to toe, sticking onto the fine, downy body hair. This protective layer will help guard the fragile skin against the long-term effects of amniotic fluid. It’ll wear off around the end of your pregnancy, but your baby may be born with some of it still intact.

Your baby’s stomach has started producing gastric juices so it’ll be able to absorb the amniotic fluid that gets swallowed. This fluid will make its way to the kidneys for processing and then be passed back into the amniotic sac.

Buds that will become baby teeth are forming in the gums, although it will be a long time before you see any actual teeth, with most children getting teeth no earlier than six-nine months of age.

What you can do:

  • Get a pregnancy massage. As well as helping you to relax and ease some of those pregnancy discomforts, massage can also have a beneficial effect on your circulation and digestive system. Check with your midwife before you have any kind of massage and make sure you tell your massage therapist you’re pregnant.
  • Try and get a good balance between staying active and getting some rest. Going to bed at the same time each night might help you stay in a good sleep routine. Easing off on high intensity exercise and opting for walking or swimming instead, might feel more comfortable as your bump continues to grow.

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Wk20

Congratulations – you’re half way there! Only another 20 weeks or so to go before you’ll be meeting your baby for the first time.

There are still some more body changes to come and one may be that your navel could pop out in the near future as your growing uterus pushes the skin over your belly outwards.

You may find you’ll become a bit breathless as your lungs process more oxygen for the baby and your uterus takes up more space in your body, pushing against your internal organs.

If you feel a bit short of breath, sit down and breathe steadily until you feel better. Any sudden, severe breathlessness should be checked by your doctor right away.

Your thyroid glands, which regulate your metabolism, may become more active and make you sweat more than usual, so keep drinking water regularly.

What you can do:

  • If you haven’t had your 18-20 week ultrasound, make a booking this week. As well as checking to see how your baby is developing you can also find out the sex if you want to know.
  • Start singing, talking or even reading stories to your baby. They can hear your voice and by the time they are born will recognise it. Encourage your partner to talk to your bump too.
  • Consider planning a babymoon. Taking some time away from home with your partner can be a great way to connect, but don’t leave it too long if you want to fly. Pregnant women are advised not to fly as they progress later into pregnancy. Check with your doctor to make sure you’re ok to fly, and advise the airline before you book to make sure they will allow you to fly with them.

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Weighing 320g and measuring 16cm in length, your baby is as long as a banana this week.

Growing rapidly, your baby’s organs and systems are becoming more complex every day. As muscles and the nervous system continue to develop, baby's activity level will increase. You may be able to feel movement as it stretches, twists and wiggles in your belly, testing out its arms and legs.

The five senses are at an important stage of development as the nerve cells that support them are forming in the brain. Baby's now able to hear sounds like your belly rumbling and recognise your voice. The brain is also developing memory and thinking centres.

If you’re having a girl, by now she will have eggs in her ovaries.

What you can do:

  • If you haven’t had your 18-20 week ultrasound, make a booking this week. As well as checking to see how your baby is developing you can also find out the sex if you want to know.
  • Start singing, talking or even reading stories to your baby. They can hear your voice and by the time they are born will recognise it. Encourage your partner to talk to your bump too.
  • Consider planning a babymoon. Taking some time away from home with your partner can be a great way to connect, but don’t leave it too long if you want to fly. Pregnant women are advised not to fly as they progress later into pregnancy. Check with your doctor to make sure you’re ok to fly, and advise the airline before you book to make sure they will allow you to fly with them.

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Wk21

You’re probably looking quite pregnant by now as your uterus reaches up to your belly button and gives you a lovely baby bump.

Unfortunately, your growing belly can impact your digestive system, giving you heartburn and indigestion. A quick burp may give some relief from indigestion pain, and there are a few simple remedies you can try to alleviate heartburn. Consider eating smaller, regular meals, avoiding food that may irritate your tummy like spicy or greasy things. You can also take an antacid that is suitable in pregnancy. Ask your pharmacist to recommend one

What you can do:

  • Have you decided on baby names yet? Your partner might have different ideas and you’ll need to negotiate! There are plenty of resources in books or online to go to for inspiration. Your family and friends will probably have a few suggestions for you too, especially if certain names run in the family.
  • If you haven’t talked to your workplace yet about your maternity leave and entitlements, now’s the time. It can be different from company to company. You’ll need to find out what period of notice you should give before going on maternity leave.

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The size of a large carrot, your baby measures about 27cm this week (measured crown to heel) and weighs about 360g.

Your baby's brain is continuing to develop, but it still has a smooth surface at the moment, not the usual wavy mass you'd expect to see. As the brain and nerve endings get more complex, so your baby's senses increase. You can now add touch to the list of new sensations it can experience. Baby may often be sucking a thumb or stroking its own face – adorable!

Your baby can now absorb water from the amniotic fluid that's being swallowed and there are lots of tiny taste buds on the tongue.

What you can do:

  • Have you decided on baby names yet? Your partner might have different ideas and you’ll need to negotiate! There are plenty of resources in books or online to go to for inspiration. Your family and friends will probably have a few suggestions for you too, especially if certain names run in the family.
  • If you haven’t talked to your workplace yet about your maternity leave and entitlements, now’s the time. It can be different from company to company. You’ll need to find out what period of notice you should give before going on maternity leave.

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Wk22

Are you feeling a bit unsteady on your feet, or knocking into things more than usual? Your clumsiness could be due to your body and brain juggling to adapt to your changing body proportions. The extra weight you’re carrying, loose ligaments and a changed centre of gravity can all combine to upset your equilibrium.

Take extra care not to lose your balance. If you’re not already in more ‘sensible’ shoes, it may be time to say goodbye to the heels and wear flatter ones. You’re going to be more comfortable in them as your bump gets bigger and heavier in the coming weeks.

As you may have come to expect, your breasts are undergoing more changes. Small lumps on your nipples called ‘Montgomery’s tubercles’ will start to produce a substance to protect the nipple during breastfeeding.

What you can do:

  • Continue to take your Elevit supplement to help support all of the important developments your baby is going through.
  • Have you read up on breastfeeding yet? Your midwife probably has a leaflet you can read and you can discuss any questions you may have with her. If not, there are plenty of other resources both online and in print.
  • That growing baby bump may be causing haemorrhoids (piles), as it presses down on your major blood vessels. Try to avoid getting constipated as straining on the toilet can irritate the condition. You can buy a cream from the pharmacy for relief from the symptoms, or sit in a warm bath. Ask your doctor for advice if you're concerned.

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As long as a cucumber at around 28cm, your baby weighs about 450g this week.

There’s a lot going on Your Baby this week. They should now be settling into a regular pattern of sleeping and moving around. You may find it's lively when you're resting and asleep when you're up and about. Try and nap in the day when you can if you’re missing out on sleep at night. What else?

  • The brain is growing at a great rate, producing tons of new brain cells. It will continue to expand until your tiny bub is about five years old.
  • The skin is less transparent than it was but you can still make out the network of blood vessels underneath.
  • Tiny fingernails are forming and will continue to grow over the coming weeks.
  • A baby boy will have a rudimentary form of sperm in his testes, as they start to move into his scrotum.

Oh, and your baby now has sweat glands! What a busy baby.

What you can do:

  • Continue to take your Elevit supplement to help support all of the important developments your baby is going through.
  • Have you read up on breastfeeding yet? Your midwife probably has a leaflet you can read and you can discuss any questions you may have with her. If not, there are plenty of other resources both online and in print.
  • That growing baby bump may be causing haemorrhoids (piles), as it presses down on your major blood vessels. Try to avoid getting constipated as straining on the toilet can irritate the condition. You can buy a cream from the pharmacy for relief from the symptoms, or sit in a warm bath. Ask your doctor for advice if you're concerned.

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Wk23

Your expanding uterus may start pressing on your bladder again, making you want to go to the toilet more often. It can be a bit annoying to have to make so many trips to the bathroom, especially at night, but it’s better to do so than try to hang on.

The extra weight of your pregnancy may be giving you aching hips, particularly at night. Use cushions to support yourself in bed if you’re in discomfort.

Pregnancy weight can also cause backache. Learn to adjust your posture and opt to sit on chairs that provide good back support. Massage and a warm heat pad might help.

Something you won’t be aware of is that your cervix is probably sealed by now with a thick plug of mucus and blood. It’ll come away just before labour, when it’s called a ‘show’.

What you can do:

  • Keep your partner involved with your pregnancy and the development of your baby, by letting him feel your bump and talk to your baby through your belly. He may be able to make out the baby’s heartbeat soon if he puts his ear to your belly and listens carefully.
  • Keep regular appointments with your dentist. Your teeth and gums are likely to be more sensitive during pregnancy and may be prone to swelling. Let your dentist know that you’re pregnant.

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Your baby has been very busy growing this week and now weighs 500g. Measuring about 28cm long, they are around the size of a papaya or very large mango.

Although your baby's more in proportion, it's still wrinkly as there aren't enough fat stores yet. Bones and organs are still showing through the thin skin.

The inner ear bones have now hardened, making baby's hearing much sharper. It can make out different noises coming from both inside and outside of your body. Keep talking and singing to your baby so it can learn your voice. It may move in response to the stimulation and give you a little kick!

What you can do:

  • Keep your partner involved with your pregnancy and the development of your baby, by letting him feel your bump and talk to your baby through your belly. He may be able to make out the baby’s heartbeat soon if he puts his ear to your belly and listens carefully.
  • Keep regular appointments with your dentist. Your teeth and gums are likely to be more sensitive during pregnancy and may be prone to swelling. Let your dentist know that you’re pregnant.

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Wk24

If you feel a slight jerking motion in your belly, it may be your baby having hiccups! And if you put your hand on your belly you might feel some movement.

Happily, any round ligament pain you have been feeling in the low sides of your belly may start to ease now.

What you can do:

  • Draw up a birth plan that allows you to spell out to your healthcare professional how you’d like to deliver your baby. You won’t be tied to it and you are free to change your mind, but it can help you feel organised and in control on the big day.
  • You and your partner might want have some fun putting together a Spotify or iTunes playlist to help you through labour.
  • This could also be a good time to share your wishes and thoughts with your partner or other supporters.

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Weighing in at about 600g, your baby is now about 29cm from crown to feet and is about the size of a grapefruit.

These are exciting times! You may have your next antenatal check-up this week and it might be possible to hear your baby’s heartbeat through a stethoscope.

The little one is starting to develop it’s immune system, thanks to new white blood cells that will help fight off infections when the time comes to enter the outside world.

Baby’s lungs are also getting ready for that first all-important breath. In the meantime, the little one is using amniotic fluid to practise breathing ahead of the big day.

What you can do:

  • Draw up a birth plan that allows you to spell out to your healthcare professional how you’d like to deliver your baby. You won’t be tied to it and you are free to change your mind, but it can help you feel organised and in control on the big day.
  • You and your partner might want have some fun putting together a Spotify or iTunes playlist to help you through labour.
  • This could also be a good time to share your wishes and thoughts with your partner or other supporters.

Personalise your Journey

Wk25

Are you starting to leak a little urine when you cough are laugh? This may be a result of your growing uterus pushing against your pelvic floor muscles.

It’s a good time to start pelvic floor exercises, if you haven’t already. And it’s best to keep doing them for life. They’ll help tighten up those muscles and reduce bladder leakage now and in the future.

If constipation is bothering you, drink plenty of water, eat lots of fruit and vegetables and keep active.

If your eyes are starting to feel dry and gritty, speak to your pharmacist about eye drops.

What you can do:

  • It’s a good time to think about getting your home ready for the new arrival. You may already have a room set aside, but you’ll probably want to decorate it. A few pictures or cartoons can brighten up a plain wall and make it feel more comforting for both you and the baby.
  • If you have other children, this could be a good time talk to them about the new arrival and resolve any concerns they may have.

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Weighing in at about 660g, your baby is now about 33cm from crown to feet and a similar size to a medium eggplant.

The little one is becoming quite dextrous, and is able to clench and grip.

The bones are starting to harden, the skin is losing its transparency and there are permanent teeth developing beneath the milk teeth.

It’s all systems go and baby is also preparing for the first meal in the outside world and is developing nerves that will enable latching and suckling.

What you can do:

  • It’s a good time to think about getting your home ready for the new arrival. You may already have a room set aside, but you’ll probably want to decorate it. A few pictures or cartoons can brighten up a plain wall and make it feel more comforting for both you and the baby.
  • If you have other children, this could be a good time talk to them about the new arrival and resolve any concerns they may have.

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Wk26

Are you starting to feel your tummy muscles tightening and then relaxing? If so, these could be practice contractions called Braxton Hicks contractions.

They are named after the doctor who identified them and are not real contractions. They usually last about 30 seconds and stop if you change position. They’re normal and just your body getting ready for labour. If you experience any contractions that get stronger over time or that are labour-like symptoms, notify your healthcare professional straight away.

As the skin over your belly and breasts stretches, you may notice stretch marks start to appear. They’re pink at first and eventually fade to silver after birth. You can’t prevent them, but keeping to a healthy weight can help. A good skin moisturiser may help if your skin feels dry and itchy.

What you can do:

  • Have you and your partner discussed how you'd prefer to move your baby around? You might want to investigate different sling, buggy and pram options, including pre-loved models.
  • If you're planning to return to work after your baby's born, start checking out the childcare options in your area or near your work. Remember, there may be a waiting list and don’t forget to check references.

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Weighing in at about 820g, your baby is now about 36cm from crown to feet and about the size of a large eggplant.

The little one is starting to develop senses and is able to feel, hear and taste. The pulse may even speed up in response to sound. So, don’t be surprised if you feel a rhythmic sensation when you play your favourite music.

Your baby’s spine is also stronger and more supple now a lot of fat and muscle is starting to form. Remember to keep taking Elevit to support your own health and your baby's development.

What you can do:

  • Have you and your partner discussed how you'd prefer to move your baby around? You might want to investigate different sling, buggy and pram options, including pre-loved models.
  • If you're planning to return to work after your baby's born, start checking out the childcare options in your area or near your work. Remember, there may be a waiting list and don’t forget to check references.

Personalise your Journey

Wk27

You should be putting on weight steadily now. And that’s a good thing! If your feet and ankles are swollen, it’s probably because of the extra fluids you’re carrying. Look after yourself and sit down with your feet up when you can. If your hands and fingers are a bit puffy, leave your rings off.

It may seem counter-intuitive, but keep drinking plenty of water. This will help you to flush out your system. Mention any swelling to your doctor or midwife.

Remember that every woman is different, so make a note to discuss your ideal weight gain during your next antenatal visit.

What you can do:

  • If you’re feeling a bit nervous about labour and birth, it can be helpful to share your feelings with other women who already have children. Your midwife is also there to give you support and advice.
  • Have you been putting money aside to help with the extra expenses of pregnancy and parenthood? If not, consider starting a savings account for your baby’s needs and possibly for education in the future.

Personalise your Journey

This is a big week and your baby should be weighing in close to the 1kg mark and will be about 37cm from crown to feet, about the size of a cabbage.

The thumb sucking that started a few weeks ago may now be a regular and soothing habit. The movement will help strengthen the cheek and jaw muscles and have them ready for feeding.

At the same time, the little brain is maturing and developing more sophisticated systems.

The eyelashes will be fully grown by now and the eyelids will start to open. Baby may be able to detect light coming in through your belly.

What you can do:

  • If you’re feeling a bit nervous about labour and birth, it can be helpful to share your feelings with other women who already have children. Your midwife is also there to give you support and advice.
  • Have you been putting money aside to help with the extra expenses of pregnancy and parenthood? If not, consider starting a savings account for your baby’s needs and possibly for education in the future.

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Wk28

Have your breasts started to leak a little? If so, it’s colostrum – the creamy liquid that nourishes your baby before your breast milk arrives? If it’s obvious, you may want to try pads in your bra to absorb the fluid. Don’t be alarmed if you haven’t experienced this – many women don’t produce colostrum until after giving birth.

Try eating smaller meals if you are experiencing heartburn or reflux as your uterus pushes on your stomach. Also, avoid fried and spicy foods and try sleeping propped up on a pillow.

The extra weight you’re carrying will change your centre of gravity and may give you lower back pain. It can help to focus on your posture. Stand up straight, keep your shoulders relaxed and slightly back and try not to let your growing bump pull your spine forward.

Your regular antenatal check-ups will probably increase to every two weeks between now and 36 weeks.

What you can do:

  • If your friends are planning to throw you a baby shower, you might want to tell them that the best time is usually the middle of the 3rd trimester, just in case baby decides to come early! Don’t forget to let everyone know if you have special requests.
  • With pregnancy becoming increasingly tiring, a lot of women like to finish off work at 34 to 36 weeks, if circumstances allow. If you want to work longer, you may need medical permission.

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Weighing in at about 1kg, your baby is now about 38cm from crown to feet and as large as a head of lettuce.

The little one is entering a rapid growth phase and will plump up over the next couple of weeks. Muscle tone is also improving.

Although the external genitals in both boys and girls are visible, they are still developing, with a last few changes before birth.

The lungs are fully developed, but not quite ready to breathe air.

It is recommended that from 28 weeks you spend some time each day focusing on your baby’s movements. Most babies are more active in the morning and evening, and you will feel movements best when you relax sitting or lying down. Your baby will have similar sleep patterns as a newborn, but if you feel a decrease in their normal daily activity you should speak with your doctor or midwife.

What you can do:

  • If your friends are planning to throw you a baby shower, you might want to tell them that the best time is usually the middle of the 3rd trimester, just in case baby decides to come early! Don’t forget to let everyone know if you have special requests.
  • With pregnancy becoming increasingly tiring, a lot of women like to finish off work at 34 to 36 weeks, if circumstances allow. If you want to work longer, you may need medical permission.

Personalise your Journey

Wk29

You’ll probably be feeling your baby kicking and stretching more strongly now as it doesn’t have much room to move around.

Although your pregnancy may be sapping your energy, try to stay fit and active as this will help you prepare for labour and recover from birth. Many women enjoy swimming or pregnancy aqua exercises as the water takes the weight off your feet.

It’s not unusual for your breasts to outgrow your maternity bra around this time. If so, you might want to look for a better fit.

The increasing size of your uterus will also press on your internal organs and may cause you some discomfort. If you have developed varicose veins, try to avoid standing still for long periods and sit with your legs elevated when you can. Support stockings may be helpful and foot exercises will improve blood flow.

What you can do:

  • You’ll need to start shopping your baby essentials soon if you haven’t already made a start. Apart from nursery basics and a mode of transport, baby will need clothes and bibs, feeding equipment (even if you’re breastfeeding), toiletries and nappies. You may be amazed at how many nappies baby goes through in a day!

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As big as a butternut pumpkin and weighing in at about 1.25kg, your baby is now about 40cm from crown to feet.

The little one is getting smarter by the week and the growing brain can now control breathing and body temperature.

Baby’s sight is also developing at a rapid rate, and the eyes can tell the difference between sunlight or artificial light outside.

What you can do:

  • You’ll need to start shopping your baby essentials soon if you haven’t already made a start. Apart from nursery basics and a mode of transport, baby will need clothes and bibs, feeding equipment (even if you’re breastfeeding), toiletries and nappies. You may be amazed at how many nappies baby goes through in a day!

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Wk30

Has sleep become more of a problem lately? Your growing belly may make it difficult to find a comfortable sleeping position and you may need to get up to go to the toilet during the night.

Try lying on your left side in bed and use pillows between your legs and under your belly for support. You could also try taking a relaxing bath before bed or drinking a glass of warm milk.

What you can do:

  • There are a number of ways you can play with your baby, even before it's born. Try pressing or patting your belly gently to see if the little one responds with movement.
  • Baby may also respond to voices or music. If you already have some children's books, you and your partner might like to try reading them to your belly.
  • Make a note to speak to your midwife about exercises you can try to help you get in shape for the birth. Examples include tailor sitting and pelvic rocks.

Personalise your Journey

Your baby is now about 41cm crown to feet and weighs in at about 1.4kg – almost as much as one and a half litres of water.

By now your little one probably has a good head of hair and the fine body hair (lanugo) is starting to disappear, although there may still be some left at birth.

Now that the eyelids have separated, there will be a lot of blinking going on.

The skeleton is forming as the bones continue to harden throughout the body, and red blood cells are now being made in the bone marrow instead of the liver.

Although it’s a tight fit in your belly, your baby may have spun round to point head down, ready for birth.

What you can do:

  • There are a number of ways you can play with your baby, even before it's born. Try pressing or patting your belly gently to see if the little one responds with movement.
  • Baby may also respond to voices or music. If you already have some children's books, you and your partner might like to try reading them to your belly.
  • Make a note to speak to your midwife about exercises you can try to help you get in shape for the birth. Examples include tailor sitting and pelvic rocks.

Personalise your Journey

Wk31

Are you becoming more forgetful and distracted than usual? This is to be expected as you become preoccupied with your baby and the upcoming birth. A lack of good-quality sleep could be a contributing factor as well.

Pregnancy will be drawing nutrients from your body to help your baby grow. It’s important to keep eating a healthy diet and taking Elevit to ensure you have enough key nutrients.

If you feel a bit short of breath as your uterus increases pressure on your lungs, it may help to keep an upright posture with your shoulders back. Your midwife or antenatal classes can help you with breathing techniques and useful exercises.

If your breathlessness is sudden, severe or painful, contact your doctor.

What you can do:

  • As your due date gets closer, it’s time to decide how you’re going to get to the hospital once labour starts, and who will go with you. You may be able to call on the help of friends or relatives.
  • Antenatal classes can help you understand and prepare for labour, birth and the reality of early parenthood and you can take your partner or a friend along with you for support.

Personalise your Journey

Weighing in at about 1.45kg – that’s about the same as a coconut! - your baby will now be about 41cm from head to feet.

The brain is still growing and the lungs, although formed, still aren’t quite ready for the first breath.

Baby’s eye colour is starting to appear as dark grey, dark blue or brown, but this may change during the first 12 months.

The little one’s pupils are changing size in response to light that comes through your belly, and the eyelids close when it’s time for a nap.

What you can do:

  • As your due date gets closer, it’s time to decide how you’re going to get to the hospital once labour starts, and who will go with you. You may be able to call on the help of friends or relatives.
  • Antenatal classes can help you understand and prepare for labour, birth and the reality of early parenthood and you can take your partner or a friend along with you for support.

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Wk32

Have you noticed your belly button making its presence known under your clothes? It should pop back to its usual state once baby makes an appearance and your body gets back to normal.

Your uterus is at its highest point around now, with the top about 12cm above your belly button. In the next few weeks, your baby will drop down into your pelvis ready for birth.

What you can do:

  • Your antenatal check-ups will become more frequent as your due date approaches. These are an opportunity to ask questions and share any concerns you have about the birth and what will happen once you go into labour.
  • You may be wondering how you’re going to feel once baby has arrived and how much your life will change. Talk to friends and relatives for their perspective on birth and parenthood. They’ll be full of useful tips too!
  • One of the most exciting milestones is packing your hospital bag. And it’s time to start preparing it.

Personalise your Journey

Weighing in at about 1.7kg, your baby will now be about 42cm from head to feet – that’s about as long as a bunch of celery.

Although the lungs are still maturing, there’s a lot of practice going on in preparation for that exciting first breath after the birth.

The little one now has fully formed toenails and is able to turn their head from side to side.

All the five senses are developed and baby can make out light as it filters through your belly and hear sounds like your rumbling tummy or a song playing on the radio.

What you can do:

  • Your antenatal check-ups will become more frequent as your due date approaches. These are an opportunity to ask questions and share any concerns you have about the birth and what will happen once you go into labour.
  • You may be wondering how you’re going to feel once baby has arrived and how much your life will change. Talk to friends and relatives for their perspective on birth and parenthood. They’ll be full of useful tips too!
  • One of the most exciting milestones is packing your hospital bag. And it’s time to start preparing it.

Personalise your Journey

Wk33

Although the lack of space in your uterus is reducing your baby’s movement, you will still feel some kicking and you may be able to make out a bottom, elbow or foot through your belly.

If this is your first baby, it may move head down about now. Sometimes it takes longer. Once this happens, it’ll be easier for you to breathe and any indigestion may ease.

If your skin stretching over you belly is making it itchy, you can try using a moisturising lotion. If it’s bothering you, check with your doctor.

What you can do:

  • As your due date approaches, you may not want to be too far away from home or your local hospital. Check with your doctor before any long-distance travel and remember that airlines might not let you fly after a certain stage.
  • Have you and your partner decided if you want to take pictures or video of the birth. If you do, check with the hospital if they have any policies and consider the practicalities of filming.

Personalise your Journey

Weighing in at about 2kg, your baby will now be about 43cm from head to toes.

This is a busy time. The little one’s brain is still developing and the head is still growing. Fat is gathering under the skin for warmth and energy. The liver is starting to store iron.

The activity level can be influenced by motion and sounds from the outside world. You may notice a response to your eating patterns and different noises around you.

There’s much sucking, swallowing and breathing practice going on in preparation for feeding and breathing after the birth. The lungs are almost finished developing and ready to expand and fill with air.

What you can do:

  • As your due date approaches, you may not want to be too far away from home or your local hospital. Check with your doctor before any long-distance travel and remember that airlines might not let you fly after a certain stage.
  • Have you and your partner decided if you want to take pictures or video of the birth. If you do, check with the hospital if they have any policies and consider the practicalities of filming.

Personalise your Journey

Wk34

Your breasts are still growing and probably feel enormous. Your nipples are also larger than normal.

Braxton Hicks practice contractions are likely to have made an appearance. These false contractions last about 30 seconds and will come and go as your body prepares for labour. They shouldn’t be painful.

If you have contractions that are regular and become more powerful, you should check with your midwife if you’re in true labour.

The amount of blood you’re pumping around will have increased by about 50 per cent by now.

What you can do:

  • Have you asked people if they can help you out in the first few weeks after baby arrives? Even if your partner has paternity leave, the assistance of grandparents can be invaluable.
  • If your family can’t help out, you might want to consider experienced paid helpers.
  • If you’re leaking a little urine, your pelvic floor muscles could benefit from pelvic floor exercises to tighten them up.
  • Ask your midwife or doctor if you have any questions about breastfeeding, such as how often to feed or what equipment you may need. You can be taught how to do it once baby’s born.

Personalise your Journey

Your baby has been growing steadily and now weighs in at about 2.3kg and is about 44cm from head to toes. About the size of a rockmelon.

The little one’s movements are becoming bigger but slower the available space becomes more constraining.

At this stage, baby may have turned upside down ready for birth and the immune system is continuing to develop to fight off infections in the outside world.

The placenta is fully mature by now and will begin to age.

What you can do:

  • Have you asked people if they can help you out in the first few weeks after baby arrives? Even if your partner has paternity leave, the assistance of grandparents can be invaluable.
  • If your family can’t help out, you might want to consider experienced paid helpers.
  • If you’re leaking a little urine, your pelvic floor muscles could benefit from pelvic floor exercises to tighten them up.
  • Ask your midwife or doctor if you have any questions about breastfeeding, such as how often to feed or what equipment you may need. You can be taught how to do it once baby’s born.

Personalise your Journey

Wk35

Are you experiencing new aches and pains? It’s your body getting ready for the birth. Pain in your pelvis may be brought on by your joints stretching and ligaments in the small of your back may be softening, giving you backache.

You may be waking up with a slightly puffy face in the morning and your feet and ankles may be swollen by the end of the day. Remember to rest as much as you can, preferably with your feet up.

It’s common to have vivid dreams that involve birth and visions of motherhood. They are probably just your brain sorting through your thoughts and anxieties.

What you can do:

  • Find out at what point you need to call your hospital or birth centre once labour has started, and what will happen when you get there. You might like to ask for a tour of the birth rooms if you haven’t seen them already.
  • Have you set a date to start your maternity leave? It may come as a huge relief now you are heavily pregnant, especially if you’ve had to commute some distance.
  • Having a few weeks of time to yourself before the baby arrives can help you relax and prepare for the incredible experience of birth and motherhood.
  • If you have other children, relatives or close friends may be able to take care of them for a few days after the birth.

Personalise your Journey

Weighing in at about 2.6kg, your baby will now be about 46cm from head to feet. The size of a honeydew melon, space is getting tight.

The little one’s lungs are almost ready for that all-important first breath and the digestive system is almost complete.

It’s getting quite cramped in your uterus. Baby has grown and has plump and fleshy arms and legs. Don’t be surprised if you are you being prodded, kicked and jabbed awake in the early morning.

What you can do:

  • Find out at what point you need to call your hospital or birth centre once labour has started, and what will happen when you get there. You might like to ask for a tour of the birth rooms if you haven’t seen them already.
  • Have you set a date to start your maternity leave? It may come as a huge relief now you are heavily pregnant, especially if you’ve had to commute some distance.
  • Having a few weeks of time to yourself before the baby arrives can help you relax and prepare for the incredible experience of birth and motherhood.
  • If you have other children, relatives or close friends may be able to take care of them for a few days after the birth.

Personalise your Journey

Wk36

Sometime in these last weeks of pregnancy, your baby’s head is likely to drop down into your pelvis, or engage, ready for birth.

When this happens, you may notice your bump move down a little and feel more pressure on your pelvis. Although this can give you more breathing room and less heartburn, you may need to go to the toilet more often.

If your baby hasn’t turned head-down by 37 weeks, the doctor may try some manoeuvres through your belly. Don’t worry if the little one leaves it to the last minute as some babies engage only during labour.

What you can do:

  • You may want to get busy in the kitchen and stock the freezer with some homemade meals like soups and stews. They’ll come in handy in the early weeks of parenthood, as you won’t have much time or energy for cooking with a new baby around!
  • You’ll be having check-ups about every week from now on. This is a good time to discuss any questions or niggling concerns about labour and birth.
  • Keep your mobile charged and make a list of important people to call when labour starts, such as the hospital, your midwife, the person taking you to the hospital and anyone looking after your children or pets.

Personalise your Journey

Weighing in at around 2.7kg, your baby is now as long as a large cos lettuce - about 47cm from head to toes.

Baby now has a cute cherub face, thanks to the fat stores that have been building up.

The little body is almost fully developed and will be growing less in length than at other stages of pregnancy.

By now, your baby has a functioning digestive system and well-practised sucking and swallowing reflexes ready for the first feed.

What you can do:

  • You may want to get busy in the kitchen and stock the freezer with some homemade meals like soups and stews. They’ll come in handy in the early weeks of parenthood, as you won’t have much time or energy for cooking with a new baby around!
  • You’ll be having check-ups about every week from now on. This is a good time to discuss any questions or niggling concerns about labour and birth.
  • Keep your mobile charged and make a list of important people to call when labour starts, such as the hospital, your midwife, the person taking you to the hospital and anyone looking after your children or pets.

Personalise your Journey

Wk37

You’re on the home stretch! Your baby may arrive any time between 37 and 42 weeks, so it’s best to be prepared for labour from now on.

Your cervix will start to soften in preparation for birth. You may have increased vaginal discharge and you’ll lose the plug of mucus and blood sometime before you start labour. This is called a show. Call your midwife when it happens.

Look after yourself by taking naps during the day. This is especially important if your night sleep is regularly interrupted by trips to the toilet and digs from baby.

What you can do:

  • You may want to make a practice run to the hospital to work out the best route and how long it will take. It’s a good idea to also have a backup for your chosen transport method.
  • It’s common to want to spring clean the house in late pregnancy. So, don’t be surprised if you find yourself enthusiastically cleaning and reorganising cupboards from top to bottom!

Personalise your Journey

Weighing in at about 2.9kg, your baby will now be a about 48cm from head to toes – around the same as rainbow chard.

At this stage the little one looks like a newborn and is considered full term - ready to arrive at any time. In fact, research suggests that your baby triggers labour with hormones when it becomes too cramped.

Baby’s immune system will continue to develop over the coming weeks and after birth. Once born, breastfeeding may also provide additional antibodies to help fight illness and infection.

What you can do:

  • You may want to make a practice run to the hospital to work out the best route and how long it will take. It’s a good idea to also have a backup for your chosen transport method.
  • It’s common to want to spring clean the house in late pregnancy. So, don’t be surprised if you find yourself enthusiastically cleaning and reorganising cupboards from top to bottom!

Personalise your Journey

Wk38

As your due date approaches, you may find your Braxton Hicks practice contractions intensify. If you feel twinges or a buzzing sensation lower in your pelvis, this may be your baby’s head pressing down on your pelvic floor.

If your waters break, make a note of the colour and smell of the liquid and then call your midwife, doctor and/or hospital with the details. It’ll help them understand what’s happening inside your belly and they can advise you what to do.

What you can do:

  • Learn how to recognise the signs of the onset of labour. These are typically the show of bloody mucus being passed out, your waters breaking and persistent contractions that form a regular pattern and become stronger over time.
  • You may want to make a practice run to the hospital to work out the best route and how long it will take. It’s a good idea to also have a backup for your chosen transport method.

Personalise your Journey

Your baby will now be –the size of a small watermelon – about 50cm in length and weigh about 3kg.

Looking just like a newborn, baby has very little space to move, but still wants to do so. Movements will feel stronger and slower and you should be able to make out body parts as he or she gets into position.

If the baby stops moving or movement drops off considerably, consult your healthcare professional.

What you can do:

  • Learn how to recognise the signs of the onset of labour. These are typically the show of bloody mucus being passed out, your waters breaking and persistent contractions that form a regular pattern and become stronger over time.
  • You may want to make a practice run to the hospital to work out the best route and how long it will take. It’s a good idea to also have a backup for your chosen transport method.

Personalise your Journey

Wk39

If your baby plans to arrive on time, you don’t have long to wait to meet him.

By now you should have stopped working and be making the most of some down time before bub arrives.

Be sure to keep all of your check-ups and ask your healthcare professional any last-minute questions you may have about labour and recovery.

Don’t forget to spend some quality time with your partner. Take some easy walks together or see a movie. Pretty soon your twosome will become a threesome and time together as a couple will be harder to have – at least for a little while.

What you can do:

  • If you’re planning on breastfeeding, buy two or three nursing bras. They’re designed to give you support while letting you access your breasts easily and discreetly.
  • Rest as much as possible – this can’t be overstated. Nap, put your feet up and just relax as much as you can. Life’s about to get very busy.

Personalise your Journey

Weighing in at about 3.1kg, your baby will now be about 35cm from head to bottom. That’s about the size of a mini watermelon – and probably feels it too!

The little one’s bowel is filled with a sticky green substance called meconium. This is the waste product of the amniotic fluid that’s been swallowed over the past weeks and it will be excreted after birth as the first bowel movements.

Although most of the fine body hair called lanugo has gone, your baby could still have traces of the white, greasy vernix that’s been protecting the skin.

You may be given an accurate estimate of your baby’s size at your 38-week antenatal visit.

What you can do:

  • If you’re planning on breastfeeding, buy two or three nursing bras. They’re designed to give you support while letting you access your breasts easily and discreetly.
  • Rest as much as possible – this can’t be overstated. Nap, put your feet up and just relax as much as you can. Life’s about to get very busy.

Personalise your Journey

Wk40

Almost there! If your baby’s on time, it’s officially the last week before you become a mum. It won’t be long before you meet your newest family member face-to-face.

Don’t worry if you don’t give birth on your due date, only around five percent of babies arrive punctually.

Rest and put your feet up as much as you can while you play the waiting game. Try to stay relaxed ahead of the first signs of labour.

What you can do:

  • Bond with your partner and offer reassurance as you explain the stages of labour and go through your birth plan together. Point out how and when you may need some support.
  • If you're leaking a lot of colostrum from your nipples, use breast pads to protect your clothing.
  • Make sure you have all your important items at hand for when labour starts, such as the phone list of who to call and your hospital bag, packed and ready to go!

And finally…

This is the last of the weekly information to help you understand your pregnancy a little better. At 40 weeks, you’ve reached the end of one journey, and you are about to embark on an amazing new one – your role as mum.

For continued nutritional support following birth, Elevit Breastfeeding provides tailored nutrition for breastfeeding mums. If you won’t be breastfeeding, Elevit Women’s Multi can help support your busy routine.

Good luck, stay well and enjoy your beautiful new addition to your family.

Personalise your Journey

Weighing in between 3-4kg, your baby will now be anywhere between 48 and 56cm long.

The little one is now a fully-fledged mini human, full of potential and ready for life on the outside.

In these last few weeks, baby has been packing on a layer of fat and cuteness, all ready for you to love and bond with.

What you can do:

  • Bond with your partner and offer reassurance as you explain the stages of labour and go through your birth plan together. Point out how and when you may need some support.
  • If you're leaking a lot of colostrum from your nipples, use breast pads to protect your clothing.
  • Make sure you have all your important items at hand for when labour starts, such as the phone list of who to call and your hospital bag, packed and ready to go!

And finally…

This is the last of the weekly information to help you understand your pregnancy a little better. At 40 weeks, you’ve reached the end of one journey, and you are about to embark on an amazing new one – your role as mum.

For continued nutritional support following birth, Elevit Breastfeeding provides tailored nutrition for breastfeeding mums. If you won’t be breastfeeding, Elevit Women’s Multi can help support your busy routine.

Good luck, stay well and enjoy your beautiful new addition to your family.

Personalise your Journey


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Breastmilk is best for Babies


Before proceeding, please read the important notice below.

Breastfeeding is best for babies and has many benefits, such as protecting your baby from infection while their immune system develops. It is important that you eat a healthy, balanced diet in preparation for and during breastfeeding. Infant formula is designed to replace breast milk when an infant is not breastfed. Combining breast and bottle feeding in your baby’s first weeks of life may reduce your supply of breast milk, and reversing a decision not to breastfeed is difficult. The social and financial implications of using infant formula should be considered when choosing a method of feeding. Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions when preparing and using infant formula, including proper sterilisation of bottles and using boiled water. Improper use of an infant formula may make your baby ill. Always consult your doctor, midwife or health care professional for advice about feeding your baby.

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